Arduino

Arduino is an open source computer hardware and software company, project, and user community that designs and manufactures single-board microcontrollers and microcontroller kits for building digital devices and interactive objects that can sense and control objects in the physical and digital world.

Arduino board designs use a variety of microprocessors and controllers. The boards are equipped with sets of digital and analog input/output (I/O) pins that may be interfaced to various expansion boards or Breadboards and other circuits. The boards feature serial communications interfaces, including USB on some models, which are also used for loading programs from personal computers.

HISTORY

The Arduino project started at the Interaction Design Institute Ivrea (IDII) in Ivrea, Italy. At that time, the students used a BASIC Stamp microcontroller at a cost of $50, a considerable expense for many students. In 2003 Hernando Barragán created the development platform Wiring as a Master’s thesis project at IDII, under the supervision of Massimo Banzi and Casey Reas, who are known for work on the Processing language. The project goal was to create simple, low cost tools for creating digital projects by non-engineers. The Wiring platform consisted of a printed circuit board (PCB) with an ATmega168 microcontroller, an IDE based on Processing and library functions to easily program the microcontroller. In 2003, Massimo Banzi, with David Mellis, another IDII student, and David Cuartielles, added support for the cheaper ATmega8 microcontroller to Wiring. But instead of continuing the work on Wiring, they forked the project and renamed it Arduino.

The initial Arduino core team consisted of Massimo Banzi, David Cuartielles, Tom Igoe, Gianluca Martino, and David Mellis, but Barragán was not invited to participate.

Following the completion of the Wiring platform, lighter and less expensive versions were distributed in the open-source community.

Adafruit Industries, a New York City supplier of Arduino boards, parts, and assemblies, estimated in mid-2011 that over 300,000 official Arduinos had been commercially produced, and in 2013 that 700,000 official boards were in users’ hands.

BASIC COMPONENTS OF ARDUINO

[1] Power USB

Arduino board can be powered by using the USB cable from your computer. All you need to do is connect the USB cable to the USB connection.

[2] Power

Arduino boards can be powered directly from the AC mains power supply by connecting it to the Barrel Jack .

[3] Voltage Regulator

The function of the voltage regulator is to control the voltage given to the Arduino board and stabilize the DC voltages used by the processor and other elements.

[4] Crystal Oscillator

The crystal oscillator helps Arduino in dealing with time issues. By using the crystal oscillator. The number printed on top of the Arduino crystal is 16.000H9H. It tells us that the frequency is 16,000,000 Hertz or 16 MHz.

[5,17] Arduino Reset

You can reset your Arduino board, i.e., start your program from the beginning. You can reset the UNO board in two ways. First, by using the reset button on the board. Second, you can connect an external reset button to the Arduino pin labelled RESET.

[6,7,8,9] Pins (3.3, 5, GND, Vin)

  • 3.3V (6) − Supply 3.3 output volt

  • 5V (7) − Supply 5 output volt. Most of the components used with Arduino board works fine with 3.3 volt and 5 volt.

  • GND (8) − There are several GND pins on the Arduino, any of which can be used to ground your circuit.

  • Vin (9) − This pin also can be used to power the Arduino board from an external power source, like AC mains power supply.

[10] Analog pins

The Arduino UNO board has five analog input pins A0 through A5. These pins can read the signal from an analog sensor like the humidity sensor or temperature sensor and convert it into a digital value that can be read by the microprocessor.

[11] Main microcontroller

Each Arduino board has its own microcontroller. You can assume it as the brain of your board. The main IC (integrated circuit) on the Arduino is slightly different from board to board. The microcontrollers are usually of the ATMEL Company. You must know what IC your board has before loading up a new program from the Arduino IDE. This information is available on the top of the IC. For more details about the IC construction and functions, you can refer to the data sheet.

[12] ICSP pin

Mostly, ICSP is an AVR, a tiny programming header for the Arduino consisting of MOSI, MISO, SCK, RESET, VCC, and GND. It is often referred to as an SPI (Serial Peripheral Interface), which could be considered as an “expansion” of the output. Actually, you are slaving the output device to the master of the SPI bus.

[13] Power LED indicator

This LED should light up when you plug your Arduino into a power source to indicate that your board is powered up correctly. If this light does not turn on, then there is something wrong with the connection.

[14] TX and RX LEDs

On your board, you will find two labels: TX (transmit) and RX (receive). They appear in two places on the Arduino UNO board. First, at the digital pins 0 and 1, to indicate the pins responsible for serial communication. Second, the TX and RX led (13). The TX led flashes with different speed while sending the serial data. The speed of flashing depends on the baud rate used by the board. RX flashes during the receiving process.

[15] Digital I/O

The Arduino UNO board has 14 digital I/O pins (of which 6 provide PWM (Pulse Width Modulation) output. These pins can be configured to work as input digital pins to read logic values (0 or 1) or as digital output pins to drive different modules like LEDs, relays, etc. The pins labelled “~” can be used to generate PWM.

[16] AREF

AREF stands for Analog Reference. It is sometimes, used to set an external reference voltage (between 0 and 5 Volts) as the upper limit for the analog input pins.

ADVANTAGES

  • Inexpensive.

  • Cross-platform- The Arduino Software (IDE) runs on Windows, Macintosh OSX, and Linux operating systems. Most microcontroller systems are limited to Windows.

  • Open source and extensible software.

  • Open source and extensible hardware.

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